Just How Can Noise Cancelling Headphones Work

Noise-cancelling headphones are the standard nowadays, ever since Bose first introduced these devices to the industry. Even though we all seem to take them granted and use them abundantly, it’s surprisingly to think about the amount of people who don’t know how these headphones work.

Noise-cancelling headphones are probably much more complex than you think, they are made-up of several components with each one being a crucial element to the working of the device.

Throughout the next few sections we’ll give you an overview of the two different types of noise-cancelling headphones, then go into detail on the components of active noise-cancelling headphones.

Passive Noise-Cancelling

Passive noise-cancelling headphones are the simplest variation. They don’t have any specialist components or circuitry that provide them with noise-cancelling features. Instead, much more emphasis is placed on the design of the actual headphones. In other words, passive noise-cancelling headphones simply block out the noise instead of deflecting it.

The most effective types are closed-back headphones and in-ear canal headphones. Other types such as open-back headphones and earbud headphones still provide some sort of passive noise-cancelling, but not nearly as much as the aforementioned types.

Headphones can cancel out noise passively through their design; the materials that are used in the design are of an insulative native, such as high-density foam. This use of materials is all it takes to block out some sound waves, especially those at a high frequencies. One major downside to this is that the additional material makes the headphones much heavier.

Even though these headphones can be effective, they’re not as great as you might think. Some of the best passive noise-cancelling headphones on the market can block as much as 15 to 20 decibels of sounds, which isn’t always enough. This is why active noise-cancelling headphones are the best devices for those who are using headphones in a professional capacity.

Active Noise-Cancelling

Active noise-cancelling headphones can provide you with all the benefits that passive noise-cancelling headphones can. However, these headphones take it a step further by adding additional features and advanced circuitry.

These headphones don’t just block out external noise, they deflect it. Active noise-cancelling headphones accomplish this by producing sound waves, which mimic the incoming noise, but send it back 180 out of phase. Two identical yet out of phase sound waves will be completely cancelled out.

Throughout the next section we’ll tell you exactly how active noise-cancelling headphones accomplish this.

The Components of Active Noise-Cancelling Headphones

Active noise-cancelling headphones are made-up of four components:

Microphone – a microphone is used to detect the sounds that are coming in from external sources, which can’t be blocked passively.

Advanced circuitry – these devices have advanced circuitry placed in the ear cup. This is connected to the microphone and everything else. The advanced circuitry replicates the incoming sound waves with the help of the microphone, the sound waves are then ready to be duplicated 180 out of phase, with the help of the speaker.

Speaker – active noise-cancelling headphones have a small speaker in the ear cup, which produces the sound waves from the advanced circuitry.

Battery – the advanced circuitry, microphone, and speaker need to be connected to an external energy source — hence the word “active”. The external energy source used is usually a rechargeable battery, which can be recharged through a USB port.

As you can see, all of these components need to be working in harmony together in order to produced the desired results. With these components, active noise-cancelling headphones can block out anywhere from 35 to 40 decibels of sound. This makes them an ideal choice for high-active office environments, airline travel, train travel, and even light construction work.

These headphones are generally produced to an extremely high quality and you will definitely be able to tell the difference between active and passive types. The only real downside to these headphones is that they can be quite expensive, but the price is worth it more often than not.

Summary

Hopefully you now have a much better idea of how noise-cancelling headphones work, both passive and active types. Chances are that the construction of these headphones are actually much more complex than you might have initially thought.

Noise-cancelling headphones can be used for much more than just listening to your music undisturbed whilst commuting to work. These devices are commonly used by racecar drivers, pilots, construction workers, and music producers. They don’t just provide you with a better listening experience, they can be extremely useful for health and safety reasons.

How Exactly Do Talkies Work?

DISCLAIMER – Usually, we’re a pretty mild-mannered bunch, but every so often, we get a question that we’ve answered so many times that we just don’t know what to say in response to it anymore. For my part, I’m tempted to say ‘magic fairy warriors’, ‘pixie dust’ or just ‘spit and happy thoughts’ – but no, I’m not going to do that. In any instance, this is the last time I will be answering this question. So, after this, you guys will have to look into the archives for answers (still, you might be able to find some good stuff back there).

All joking aside, the science behind the walkie-talkie is fairly simple to grasp (which is good, because otherwise I’d be out of a job!). I’ll render it here as a series of steps.

STEP ONE – Having tuned the walkie-talkie to the appropriate frequency (and charged the battery), you push the PTT (Push To Talk) button and speak your message.

STEP TWO – The vibrations of your voice shake a small membrane inside the walkie-talkie’s microphone.

STEP THREE – The radio’s processor then converts those vibrations into an electrical signal, which it pushes upward towards your walkie-talkie’s antenna.

STEP FOUR – The electron particles housed inside the antenna become excited (they will only respond to the set frequency) and this, in turn, ‘pushes out’ the message in the form of a radio signal.

STEP FIVE – The radio signal is then intercepted by your partner’s walkie-talkie antenna, where the incoming signal excites their electrons (which are attuned to the same frequency, of course). These electrons then in turn translate the signal into an electrical impulse, which is subsequently decoded by the processor and played out via your partner’s speakers. It is exactly the same process as you just experienced except that it has been reversed.

The fact that walkie-talkies do this practically in real time is actually nothing short of amazing, when you think about it.

Part of the reason that walkie-talkie technology has been so very successful since its initial inception is that it works very well and is very easy to use. In fact, you’d be hard pushed to find a simpler, more useful and more user-friendly technology this side of the wheel!

Thanks for your question (and I’m sorry about the rant earlier, Claudia!), hope my answer helps. If not, then I’d go with the magic fairy warriors.

New York To Aid Bird Migration By Turning Out The Lights

New York Governor Andrew Cuomo is backing a new scheme to turn off all nonessential lights in state-run buildings as a way of helping migrating birds to effectively navigate their routes.

Birds that migrate through the spring and autumn are thought to navigate by the light of the stars, using the tiny little pinpricks of light in the night sky to undertake their long and arduous yearly journeys.

However, according to ornithologists, many birds can become disorientated by artificial light, which can result in the birds flying into buildings and dying needlessly. This phenomenon is known as “fatal light attraction” and claims the lives of an estimated billion birds a year in the US alone.

Some birds die from the trauma of impacting into buildings, while others merely become lost and die from a combination of exhaustion and other hazards posed by an urban environment. A major ecological worry presented by fatal light attraction is that it can affect all areas of a bird population, killing even the stronger birds, which are vital to the maintenance of a healthy ecosystem.

The idea to preserve migratory routes by switching out – or else dimming – all nonessential lights was first put forward in the early 1990s by Toronto, Canadas FLAP program. This pioneering work was built upon by the National Audubon Society, who have so far either directly instigated, or else inspired projects similar to, their Lights Out initiative across at least 20 American cities.

According to the Audubon Societys website, “The strategy is simple: By convincing building owners and managers to turn off excess lighting during the months migrating birds are flying overhead, we help to provide them safe passage between their nesting and wintering grounds”.

Thanks to Governor Cuomos support for this initiative, the birds passing over New York City at night will now stand a much better chance of surviving than before.

“This is a simple step to help protect these migrating birds that make their home in New Yorks forests, lakes and rivers,” said Governor Cuomo in a statement.

In addition to this good news, the Governor also announced the launch of a new I Love NY Birding website, which will provide New Yorkers with information on bird watching and how to participate in the Lights Out program.

Away from state-run buildings, several prominent New York City landmarks, including The Rockefeller Centre, The Chrysler Building and Time Warner Centre have pledged to take action in support of the states massive bird population. Private citizens will also be encouraged to join in as well, making New York City a far safer place for our feathered friends.

LOOK! Eureka’s Tribute to the Bluetooth Earpiece That Could Soon Grace the City’s South Entrance

The people of Humboldt can be proud of their new city entrance, it is in the shape of a bluetooth earpiece, The monument appears to be in the shape of an earpiece sat up-wards, it’s a long leap to see it from the road (see image) but it definitely resembles a bluetooth earpiece.

Last week, the South Entry Project study group unveiled its latest plans for improving user experience for travelers entering our fair city. One of the most visually notable components of the facelift proposed by Redding-based engineering group Green Dot Transportation Solutions is a spiral concrete sculpture thingamabob to be constructed just south of the Herrick Avenue overpass (see below).

What does that thing look like? LoCO asked itself. Then it hit us. It looks like a Bluetooth earpiece, of course! Amirite? Maybe we’re promoting safe driving, here? LoCO no know.

Anyway, the sculpture, as well as other less earpiece-ish aspects of the South Entry Project — trees, medians, etc. — are the result of months of meetings wherein community feedback was sought. Since LoCO knows our readers prefer things to be on the interwebs, we will direct your discerning eyeballs to the “Preferred Alternative” page of the Eureka South Entry website where you can scope out some visuals of planned enhancements.

According to the North Coast Journal, Green Dot still needs to submit the plan to Caltrans for approval. After that, the Eureka City Council can choose to vote this glorious tribute to safe, hands-free devices into reality.

Addendum: Many LoCO commenters have expressed indignation that the city should be spending money on this type of project when more serious issues exist. This is an entirely understandable sentiment, though it should be noted that, so far, the city has only paid for a study, the majority of which ($45,000 of the $75,000 price tag) was funded by a grant from the California Transportation Commission.

City Engineer Charles Roecklein said the city will pursue more grant funding to finance the construction of the project itself, assuming it gets that far. And he’s optimistic about finding those funds. “It’s like the mayor said, somebody’sgonna get those grant funds,” Roecklein said. “There’s grant money for this kind of project.”

Source - http://lostcoastoutpost.com/2015/apr/27/look-eurekas-tribute-bluetooth-earpiece-could-soon/

Would you wear sunglasses that double as headphones?

Google Glass may be on hiatus, but our appetite for high-tech spectacles endures. One of the latest efforts comes in the form of a Kickstarter campaign for a pair of sunglasses that double as wireless headphones.

Buhel’s Bluetooth SG05 SOUNDglasses obliterated their $80,000 fundraising goal a mere 48 hours after launch, ending up with more than $400,000 by the end of the campaign. “SOUNDglasses give you innovation, freedom, safety, and easier life,” Buhel promises.

Great, but how will the music sound?

Thanks to “bone conduction technology,” SOUNDglasses let users listen to music, conduct a phone conversation, or talk to computerized personal assistants like Siri without the “impediment” of earphones. Two speakers situated in the glasses near the wearer’s temples send vibrations through the bones of the head and into the inner ear. A built-in microphone picks up what the wearer says.

This isn’t exactly revolutionary. Many hearing aids transmit sound with bone conduction, as do other headphone brands. But a main complaint for these kinds of headphones is that the sound quality leaves a lot to be desired. Will these be any different?

Here’s how the creators of SOUNDglasses address that question: “We don’t pretend that Bone Conduction is your perfect HiFi music companion, but we can say that it serves a specific purpose, which increases your safety in an infinite number of situations. The military and Google chose Bone Conduction for some of their devices…They must have thought it was not that bad, and so did nature with dolphins and whales.”

Hmm. Not the most reassuring comment, is it?

Buhel is pushing the safety angle hard to make up for any lousy sound quality. Because nothing has to actually go inside the ear for this technology to work, wearers will still be able to hear the sounds going on around them. This is a plus for what seems to be Buhel’s target demographic: athletes. It would be great to be able to bike down the busy avenues of Manhattan blasting some excellent riding tunes without losing access to one of your most vital senses.

Another problem: using these headphone-less glasses to have a phone conservation could produce some funny looks from passersby. To convince people to accept this kind of public embarrassment, any headphone-glasses combo will have to be excellent in every other way. Sound quality is important, but equally essential is style.

The SOUNDglasses come in a variety of colors and lens shades, and from the outside seem no different from your average sporty shades. This is rule number one for smart glasses: they have to be something you actually want to wear in public. Google found this out the hard way. Not even its own developers wanted to wear the goofy-looking face computer. Of course, SOUNDglasses don’t actually project any visual effects into a wearer’s line of sight, which probably eliminates some of the encumbering hardware that could inhibit a sleek design.

What would make these glasses better is if they came in a variety of frame styles. Right now, the only design on offer looks best on athletes and outdoor explorers, but doesn’t have much fashionable appeal otherwise. Google Glass got a trendy redesign to provide some fancy frame options because it knew it needed to look less geeky if it wanted to be worn by anyone other than, you know, geeks. The same goes for SOUNDglasses, especially if it wants to catch on with anyone other than athletes.

The first shipment of glasses to Kickstarter backers is slated for May of 2015. If you want to wait for the first reviews to roll in before buying, they will retail for “more than $270″ later in the summer.

Well if you had said to us, how about a sunglasses/headset mash-up we would have thought you were mad! but this kickstarter, using bone conductive technology, too which we have lots of knowledge about, We’re looking forward to receiving our pair when they are dispatched. This article was originally posted on this site.

How to be a better headphone listener

When you’re listening to speakers the sound comes from “over there,” but with headphones where is the sound? A lot depends on the recording and the headphones. With mono recordings the sound is centered inside your head, with stereo the sound picture is more complicated. Vocals, or any sound mixed to appear centered between the left and right channels, will be inside your head, like a mono recording. The sounds over to the left and right might come from next to your ears.

Listening over one of the better open-back full-size headphones, the sound might feel like it’s surrounding you. You’re in the middle of the sound field, or it might come from slightly above your head. The headphones melt away and you are one with the music. Sometimes when I’m watching a movie I forget the headphones. The sound isn’t over there, it’s all around me; I’m in the middle of a sound “bubble.”

I’m not suggesting that headphones can ever mimic what we hear from speakers. Headphones can’t do that, but the downside to speakers is they can never be heard directly; the speakers’ sound is combined with the room’s reflections, reverberations, and other forms of acoustic interference. With headphones the sound “couples” directly to your ears, so you have a far more intimate connection to the music.

With full-size over-the-ear headphones, the contours of your outer ears direct the sound to your inner ears in the same way sound is heard from speakers. In-ear headphones “bypass” the outer ear and produce a more direct connection to the recording. With purely acoustic music, the sound over headphones takes on what I call a microphone perspective, you hear what the mics “heard.”

That’s not the case with electronic music since no microphones were used to make the recording. Even so, I find lots of electronica sounds amazing, and some of the best albums were mixed to produce out-of-head stereo imaging. Listen for depth, does the sound seem very close to your ears or further away? Recordings vary a lot in their stereo imaging, but the more closely you listen, the more aware you will be of spatial cues in headphone listening. Try some of Brian Eno’s ambient albums like “On Land” and “Apollo” to hear what I’m talking about.

To get started, relax and focus on the sound. Your surroundings should be fairly quiet, close your eyes, and sink into the music. After a few minutes the separate left, center, right stereo perspectives should fall away, and your head will feel like it’s in the center of an expansive sound field.

Share your thoughts on spatial headphone listening below.

We found this excellent article here and as you can see it give us valuable information on why headphones aren’t better than speakers, but if you don’t want your neighbors complaining or your family moaning, then you’ll have to wait for the technology to come up with perfect acoustic sound.

Can constantly wearing headphones cause baldness?

No, wearing headphones, no matter how often you do it, will not cause hair loss.

This idea is tied in to the same popularly held falsehood that states that constantly wearing a hat can cause hair loss (and even premature baldness). This is, of course, completely untrue.

Here, from Health Central.com, is a particularly good rebuttal to this old wives’ tale, it deals with a case study of a man named Mark.

“One of the myths surrounding hair loss is that wearing hats will cause or contribute to premature baldness. Fortunately, for men like Mark, this is not true. There is no scientific research that shows wearing a hat contributes to hair loss. In order for a hat to cause hair loss, it would need to be tight enough to cut off circulation to the hair follicles”.  

However, you may wonder why there is hair in your hat when you take it off (and sometimes rather a lot of it)? Well, according to Health Central,

“One of the reasons many people believe that hats cause hair loss is because of the amount of hair left inside a hat when you take it off. Whenever you see this, you might worry that your hair is quickly falling out. But we lose hair every day, as much as 80 to 100 strands daily. Usually, you will see this as you comb and brush your hair or when you shower. However, your hats may catch some of this hair and as it builds up over time, it may seem as if there is a lot of hair in your hat”

We suspect it also has to do with the psychological reactions to natural conditions like male pattern baldness (or androgenetic alopecia). For example, the person believes that there must be an outside factor causing his hair loss, because it can’t be that he is simply going bald for no visible reason. Our hypothetical man tells himself that he’s strong, he’s virile and he’s still a young man – he can’t possibly be going bald, there must be some other reason for it. Hair loss can be quite traumatic and damaging to a person’s self image and baldness is often (wrongly) associated with getting older and less attractive.

In fact, the statistics concerning alopecia are actually quite alarming.

40% of American men experience hair loss by the age of 45, while 65% encounter this problem by age 60 and by age 85, a whopping 80% of American men will have nothing left to comb over. They can’t all be wearing headsets.

There are, however, some things that are proven to cause both hair loss and baldness. The following things can cause hair loss:

  • Stress.
  • Hormonal issues like hypo-thyroidism.
  • The side effects of certain medications.
  • Wearing tight hairstyles like pigtails or cornrows.
  • Some chemicals found in various hair products (e.g. permanents or relaxers).
  • Fungal infections.

To date, we don’t think anyone has ever gone bald from wearing headphones (although we certainly wouldn’t rule out the possibility that many a balding person has blamed it on them!)

If you are worried about losing your hair, a good piece of advice is to look at your grandfather. Why? Well, before we sign off, here is a final piece from Health Central.

“According to an article in ScienceDaily, the gene that is sometimes responsible for male baldness is inherited from the mother because this particular gene is found on the X chromosome. For men whose fathers became bald, this could be good news. It seems you should look to your grandfather, on your mother’s side, to find out if you have a higher risk of baldness due to genetics”.

Are Your Headphones Causing Your Acne?

We all take reasonable care of our stuff, particularly when we wear it, we wash our clothes regularly, we shower, more than twice a week! but when was the last time you cleaned your headphones? they might not look dirty, or do they? this article seemingly does.

Headphones are a necessity for the modern music-lover or phone user but your gadgets could also be taking a negative toll on your skin.

Some things in life never seem to last as long as we want them to: Your last paycheck, free cookies, or (perhaps most disappointing of all), clear skin are all relatable examples. Sure, we know that there are tons of prescribed, over-the-counter, and even some go-to natural ingredients that can treat an annoying blemish in a flash, but wouldn’t it be less frustrating to know why our pimples are, well, popping up in the first place?

While genetics and hormones play a huge role, there are certain sneaky, everyday habits that could be irritating your skin too. Like coveting those beloved gadgets of yours.

For instance, think about how your headphones go everywhere with you—school, work, the subway, the gym—and you slide them on without giving it a second thought. Cranking up the music is totally therapeutic (and yes, great for drowning out an annoying sibling), but it turns out if you’re seeing spots on your temples and jaw line, the headphones you use for your daily jam sessions to Taylor Swift might be the culprit for recurring breakouts.

“Wearing over-the-ear headphones is a perfect setup for causing an increase of acne breakouts and skin infections,” says dermatologist and Simple advisory board member Dr. Debra Luftman. “This is especially the case when you wear them during and after a workout, or if you keep them on for long periods of time. Sweat and moisture collect on and around the headphones, compressing the skin and therefore encouraging bacteria and yeast to multiply.” Gross, but true.

Luckily, a blemish-free complexion doesn’t mean retiring your giant pair of Beats or new Frends headphones for good. To keep them gunk-free, Dr. Luftman recommends giving them a daily rubdown with a makeup remover wipe. (Simple’s Cleansing Facial Wipes are so easy to toss in your bag!) Then, remember to use another wipe to clean the areas around your ears, hairline, and jaw before the next time you toss your headphones on again.

If you find that your headphones get discolored or grimy particularly often, you can also keep a stash of anti-bacterial cloths handy in your purse or backpack. Feel free to pick these up during your next drugstore run. Just be sure to let the earphones dry completely before using them again. The same bacteria that develops from sweat and moisture, can build up from any dampness that stems from your cleansing tools. Come on, putting whatever you’re listening to on pause for 10 minutes isn’t too much to ask now, is it?

Dealing with acne is never fun, but preventing it with these simple tips is music to our ears—literally!

Photographic Find of the Century Depicts Trench Life in WW1

Although it meant disobeying direct orders (and a court martial if he was discovered), Lance Corporal George Hackney obviously felt a duty to document The Great War from a soldier’s perspective. Now, to commemorate the centenary of the First World War, his incredible photographs are being displayed in public for the first time.

The astounding collection, which includes candid photographs taken in the British trenches – and at least one amazing shot of a German surrender in 1916, was compiled between 1915, when Hackney was first sent to the front lines, and 1918, when the brutal conflict finally ended, and the photographer returned home.

Before he was called up, Hackney was a keen amateur photographer, and it shows. His pictures demonstrate a very accomplished sense of composition, but never feel forced or especially posed for (as some photography from the era can). In fact, the images are easily among the most intimate and credible pictures that exist from the conflict.

Among the most remarkable shots is a poignant image of a lone soldier writing a letter home, as well as another showing a group of soldiers (in full uniform) casually napping on the deck of the ship that would eventually deliver them to the front lines.

At the time these photographs were taken, no unofficial photography was allowed on the front lines. However, using a portable folding camera about the size of a modern smart phone, the Northern Irishman was able to document the war effort discreetly and respectfully.

Hackney then gave the photographs to his own family upon his return. In addition, many of his pictures were given as gifts to the families of the men photographed, sometimes offering grieving loved ones a chance to see their missing husband, brother or son, one final time.

To cite one such example, Hackney’s Sergeant, James Scott, was killed at the Battle of Messines in May 1917. After Lance Corporal Hackney returned home, he presented Scott’s family with three pictures of him, including a striking depiction of the officer looking proud and dashing on horseback.

The Sergeant’s descendant, Mark Scott, was instrumental in uncovering the stories behind these wonderful, and often profound, images…

Hackney’s pictures also provide excellent accompaniment to the war records of the men in question, rendering them as much more than simply names and numbers, or even as symbols of pure courage and sacrifice. Hackney’s photographs present these remarkable men to a new generation as simple Human beings fighting through an incredibly difficult time to be alive.

A photograph taken at County Antrim, which depicts Hackney’s friend John Ewing writing a diary entry (or possibly a letter home), adds a Human element to the historical facts that Ewing was eventually promoted to Sergeant and subsequently won the Military Medal for bravery in the field…

Stories like this abound in Hackney’s work, which ably presents the war in a far more evocative way than the official press photographs and propaganda of the time could ever have hoped to.

When George Hackney passed away in 1977, his family donated the pictures to the Ulster Museum, where they stayed in the Museum’s archives for over 30 years. These unique, powerful documents were, in turn presented to TV Director Brian Henry Martin by museum curator Dr. Vivienne Pollock, in 2012. Martin was shown the images alongside a collection of Hackney’s personal diaries and was captivated by them.

Lance Corporal Hackney eventually became the subject of a BBC Documentary, directed by Martin, entitled, ‘The Man Who Shot The Great War’. The show aired in Northern Ireland earlier this month.

In addition, Hackney’s work is soon to be the subject of a major exhibition at the Ulster Museum.

Mr. Martin is now bringing 300 of Hackney’s images to the BBC for future use, although it is estimated that there are around 200 more that are undiscovered at the time of writing.

Amanda Moreno of the Museums of The Royal Irish Regiment, told Yahoo! News that, “As a collection of photographs of the First World War, they are totally exceptional.”

Interviewed for the film, Franky Bostyn, Chief of The Belgian Ministry of Defense said, “I think you made the photographical World War One discovery of the century.”

100 years on, George Hackney’s unique, vivid and (above all) brave photography presents us with a deeply Human portrait of life in the trenches of The Great War.

Guide Health: Reducing your risk of hearing loss

Even though this study was based in canada, we can see the same happening within the UK, great advice like Don’t try to “dig out” anything from your ear can be applied to any country or scenario.

The number of times you say “Pardon me” may be the only sign you have that your hearing has gradually lessened. It happens with age, but even so, it’s important to recognize there are steps you can take to reduce your risk and to maximize your hearing.

About 10 per cent of all Canadians have hearing loss, but as you would expect, the numbers do jump as age increases. At 45 years of age, only about 20 per cent are affected, but by age 65 it’s about 60 per cent of people. Men are more often affected than women, which may be related to noise exposure at work.

It is also thought these numbers should actually be higher because hearing loss is so gradual that it is not noticed, or because it is denied.

There are two components to hearing. Conductive hearing loss occurs when sounds are prevented from getting to the middle or inner ear, for example because of impacted earwax, a foreign body, water, or even an ear infection. Removal of the obstacle will solve this type of hearing loss.

By contrast, sensorineural hearing loss involves the inner ear and the nervous system. Unfortunately, this kind of hearing loss is usually permanent.

Your ear has three parts: the outer ear which is the part that you see, the middle ear where hearing is sensed, and the inner ear which is responsible for sending sound messages to the brain for interpretation. Incidently, the inner ear is all important in maintaining your balance, which often means that damage to the inner ear will affect both your balance and hearing.

Earaches can affect any part of your ear and reduce your hearing. Infections, a foreign body, trauma such as a blow to the ear, or even something like swimmer’s ear can be the cause, but once the earache clears your hearing returns to normal.

Earwax or cerumen can be a problem if it accumulates and plugs the ear canal. Earwax is a mixture of secretions from both sweat and earwax glands. If you are older, have narrow or misshapen ear canals, wear a hearing aid, or even have lots of hair in your ears, earwax can readily accumulate and become impacted. There are various earwax removal products available, but you need to read and follow the instructions carefully. And, if you are unsuccessful, don’t just try another product, have your ears checked first.

If you notice that your hearing has changed and you have begun taking a new medication, ask if hearing loss may be an adverse effect.

Some drugs can affect your hearing. Drugs with the potential to reduce hearing by affecting the nerves that sense sound include antibiotics like gentamicin, tetracycline, and erythromycin; the leg cramp remedy quinine; some cancer drugs; and non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs like ibuprofen and acetylsalicylic acid. This effect typically occurs over time and, usually, stopping the drug halts the loss, although hearing may not return completely.

Acetylsalicylic acid in higher doses can also cause tinnitus or ringing in your ears. The ringing may not develop into hearing loss, but it certainly interferes with hearing. Again, stopping the drug will alleviate the effect, but even reducing the dose may do the trick.

Your ears are considered to be self cleaning and you shouldn’t need to do anything else other than wash your external ear, for example when you are shampooing your hair. Don’t try to “dig out” anything from your ear, earwax included! You may push whatever you are trying to remove further into your ear. Ideally, you want to put nothing smaller than your elbow in your ear, if that’s even possible!

Take care of your hearing by wearing ear protection when you are exposed to loud noises, such as machinery or rock music. And, if you wear a hearing aid, always remember to make sure it has fresh batteries and that it fits properly. Getting older is no reason why you shouldn’t have good hearing.

New report shares details about the military communications market analysis, size, share, trends,growth and forecasts to 2020

This originally was posted on this site, Military communications always lead the way to other communications. When this market grows, the knock-on-effect is huge for other communication industries.

The global military communications market is expected to grow over the forecast period on account of growing emphasis on providing data-centric and network-centric communications. Rapid adoption of new satellite communications platforms such as Advanced Extremely High Frequency (AEHF) and US-based Mobile User Objective System (MUOS) provides protected communications capabilities for strategic command and tactical warfare operating on various platforms.

Additionally, various communication technologies such as high frequency services and software-embedded radio systems Ka band in order to limit the bandwidth limitations are some of the emerging trends in the military communications market.

The report “Military Communications Market Analysis, Market Size, Application Analysis, Regional Outlook, Competitive Strategies And Forecasts, 2014 To 2020” is available now to Grand View Researchcustomers and can also be purchased directly at

http://www.grandviewresearch.com/industry-analysis/military-communications-market

Considering the rise in demand of handheld software defined radios such as mobile radio, joint tactical radio and tetra radio systems is expected to favorably impact military communications market growth over the forecast period. The military is poised to replace and modernize aging equipments and utilize virtually unlimited IP peer-to-peer connections for embedded systems.

However, multiple standards in devices, financial constraints towards procurement and interoperability issues are the few factors that may challenge market growth through the forecast period.

North America featured among the highest adopters of military communications in 2013 and is expected to remain a key market throughout the forecast period. Adoption of latest data links and mobile satellite technologies are the factors attributable for regional market growth.

The U.S. government is expected to secure commercial capacity due to lack of appropriate military satellite systems. The Asia Pacific regional market is expected to witness significant growth over the forecast period.

Key military communications industry participants include Rockwell Collins, Northrop Grumman, BAE Systems, Alcatel-Lucent, Lockheed Martin, Harris Corporation, Thales Group and L-3 Communication.

How To Wear A Police Radio Earpiece?

meant especially for the people in uniform, Through this they communicate with one another. A message which is passed on by one police officer to another can be heard by the use of this earpiece. This is really very beneficial for the policemen. You will even find it worn by reporters or commentators during matches and reports. This helps one to hear communications while communicating.

Why To Wear These Earpieces?

The police radio earpiece comes in different forms it can be a loop or also a simple earbud like an earphone which you can fit into the ears. But often earbuds can come out while running or moving. Loops are said to be more comfortable and can easily fit into the ears. You can wear this easily in the ears. The police men wear these earpieces because –

  • To communicate with one another easily whenever they need
  • These earpieces offer better audio so that one can clearly hear the messages passed on to them
  • It is small and comfortably fits into the ears and hardly anyone around you can hear it

These earpieces are designed for professional purposes. Mainly security personnel, police officers, detectives, militaries and armies use these kinds of earpieces while they are at work or on duty. Often they feel a need to convey some message to other officers on duty. Then with the help of walkie-talkie or a radio they transmit the message to others. This is indeed a very useful device for professional people.

How To Wear?

The police radio earpiece is available in 3 different sizes – small size, medium size and large size. You have to buy the one according to the shape and size of your ear. Otherwise you may face some problems and the earpiece will either come out because it is loose or it will not fit for being smaller than your ears. So, choosing the right size is very much important. Second thing is that it comes in a pair for both right ear and left ear. But mainly policemen wear it in one ear so that they can focus on the other sounds and noises too.

You have to find out in which ear you are comfortable. Mainly people who are right handed are more comfortable in right ears and just the opposite for the left handed people. Then you have to take the earbud of the earpiece and push it properly into your ear. Make sure that it has fitted properly into your ears and will not come out. If it is loose then adjusting it in right away is necessary. Now when you are done with the earbud take the loop over your ears and push it to adjust. Use your finger to push it back to ears and make it comfortable.

Now it is the testing time. If you are comfortable with the earpiece check the sounds and noises. Is everything working properly and whether or not you can hear clearly? Once all are okay and done properly, the job is complete. Now you can tuck it inside your shirt or jacket whatever you feel more comfortable. Customized earpieces are also available which are made exactly according to the size of your ears. This will, undoubtedly, fit best in your ears. You will not even feel uneasy or uncomfortable wearing it, like most of the other earpieces.

Some Important Tips

Since the police radio earpieces are worn often and regularly, keeping it clean is very important. When you are done with it, open it and put it inside the box carefully. The wires are delicate and if you do not take proper care, it will become broken and will not work properly. Mainly these earpieces are made up of plastic and are coated with silicone adhesive. This silicon ensures a better durability of this product. Buying the right piece for your ears is essential. So, buy from a reliable store that sells excellent products. It can be an online or offline store but make sure it is reliable by checking the reviews and feedbacks of previous customers.

New Technology May Double Radio Frequency Data Capacity

A team of Columbia Engineering researchers has invented a technology—full-duplex radio integrated circuits (ICs)—that can be implemented in nanoscale CMOS to enable simultaneous transmission and reception at the same frequency in a wireless radio. Up to now, this has been thought to be impossible: transmitters and receivers either work at different times or at the same time but at different frequencies. The Columbia team, led by Electrical Engineering Associate Professor Harish Krishnaswamy, is the first to demonstrate an IC that can accomplish this. The researchers presented their work at the International Solid-State Circuits Conference (ISSCC) in San Francisco on February 25.

CoSMIC (Columbia high-Speed and Mm-wave IC) Lab full-duplex transceiver IC that can be implemented in nanoscale CMOS to enable simultaneous transmission and reception at the same frequency in a wireless radio

“This is a game-changer,” says Krishnaswamy, director of the Columbia high-Speed and Mm-wave IC (CoSMIC) Lab. “By leveraging our new technology, networks can effectively double the frequency spectrum resources available for devices like smartphones and tablets.”

In the era of Big Data, the current frequency spectrum crisis is one of the biggest challenges researchers are grappling with and it is clear that today’s wireless networks will not be able to support tomorrow’s data deluge. Today’s standards, such as 4G/LTE, already support 40 different frequency bands, and there is no space left at radio frequencies for future expansion. At the same time, the grand challenge of the next-generation 5G network is to increase the data capacity by 1,000 times.

So the ability to have a transmitter and receiver re-use the same frequency has the potential to immediately double the data capacity of today’s networks. Krishnaswamy notes that other research groups and startup companies have demonstrated the theoretical feasibility of simultaneous transmission and reception at the same frequency, but no one has yet been able to build tiny nanoscale ICs with this capability.

“Our work is the first to demonstrate an IC that can receive and transmit simultaneously,” he says. “Doing this in an IC is critical if we are to have widespread impact and bring this functionality to handheld devices such as cellular handsets, mobile devices such as tablets for WiFi, and in cellular and WiFi base stations to support full duplex communications.”

The biggest challenge the team faced with full duplex was canceling the transmitter’s echo. Imagine that you are trying to listen to someone whisper from far away while at the same time someone else is yelling while standing next to you. If you can cancel the echo of the person yelling, you can hear the other person whispering.

“If everyone could do this, everyone could talk and listen at the same time, and conversations would take half the amount of time and resources as they take right now,” explains Jin Zhou, Krishnaswamy’s PhD student and the paper’s lead author. “Transmitter echo or ‘self-interference’ cancellation has been a fundamental challenge, especially when performed in a tiny nanoscale IC, and we have found a way to solve that challenge.”

Krishnaswamy and Zhou plan next to test a number of full-duplex nodes to understand what the gains are at the network level. “We are working closely with Electrical Engineering Associate Professor Gil Zussman and his PhD student Jelena Marasevic, who are network theory experts here at Columbia Engineering,” Krishnaswamy adds. “It will be very exciting if we are indeed able to deliver the promised performance gains.”

This work was funded by the DARPA RF-FPGA program

Thankyou to columbia.edu for the tireless research, this really is an exciting invention, the possibilities if this can be brought to our industry are unbelievable.

Security Earpiece For the iPhone

With every passing day, technology is improving and it has made lives of people easier and better in many ways. Some of the latest technologies and gadgets have really been helpful to many people. If you look at the security earpiece then you will understand how advantageous it is for specific people. There are different types of these earpieces available and you can also get these for your iPhone. You just have to check whether or not these are suitable and compatible with your handset.

Use Of Security Earpieces

These earpieces are only required when you want to communicate with someone secretly. The security earpiece is fitted into the ears and normally people around you cannot see it. It is small and is connected by a very thin wire. Security personnel mainly use these types of earpieces. But people also use this when they are in a conference and want to communicate or hear something while communicating. You can also find it useful in movie sets, broadcasting of radios etc. Even it will be great for using inside classrooms and not getting caught by teachers!

This is quite small in size the voice transmitted via this cannot be heard outside. Only the person who is wearing it can hear the voice. Thus, you can secretly converse with someone while none will even know about it. In case of audio surveillance, security guards and bodyguards use this earpiece to make sure they can hear each and everything distinctly. When a person is speaking on radio in front of a microphone, he/she has to make sure that even a message comes through the earphone it is not heard outside. So, with the help of the security earpiece it is very much possible.

Connecting To Mobile

Though these earpieces are meant mainly for security purposes, many people find it cool! They use this as a style statement and wear it just for fun. It has become a part of cool accessories which many enthusiasts prefer to use while going out. It is not necessary that you have to be a spy, bodyguard or a secret agent in order to buy or use this. You can simply buy one security earpiece for your iPhone too. it also comes with a separate mouthpiece which you can put on anywhere you feel comfortable.

If you are an owner of an iPhone then you can get the security earpiece for your particular handset. The jack which will be connected to your earphone port of the mobile has to be compatible to each other, normally a 3.5mm Jack. If not then you will not be able to hear or listen to anything. This is very much important. So, it is best to buy the security earphones specially made for each model of iPhone. With the help of this you can talk over phone while driving or even you can hear songs and watch movies.

Some Useful Tips

Since you have to wear these earpieces inside your ears, you have to be much more conscious of it. Make sure that you are not allergic to the material by which earpiece is made up of. If you are then avoid using that material as it can be harmful for you. The earpiece is fitted inside the ear exactly beside your eardrum. While wearing it you have to be careful about whether or not the earpiece is touching your eardrum. If it is not touching then you will not be able to hear anything or you will hear a low voice. When you are done you have to take out that earpiece as well. In this case also you have to be very much careful.

Your ear, mainly eardrum, is very much sensitive. You have to make sure that the security earpiece you are buying for your ears is not made up of some low quality material. It can react badly with your inner ear skin. So, when you are buying one for your iPhone, you have to choose the best one made up of high quality material. These are mainly available in rubber and thus you have to confirm that you are not allergic to it. This is surely a great technology and a cool accessorise for the one who want to use it just for fun for their iPhone.

When Bob Woolmer and Hansie Cronje fell foul of the ICC in their attempt to use technology to help their communication

While technology has come to play an increasing part in the modern game, when the captain is in the middle he remains very much on his own, able only to draw on advice from his team-mates and the occasional message from the dressing room surreptitiously brought out by a water carrier or physio. But at the 1999 World Cup, South Africa tried – and failed – to find a way around the problem.

For more than a year before the tournament, Bob Woolmer (at the time South Africa’s coach and always someone looking for new approaches to old problems), had been toying with an idea he had seen work in US sport where it was common practice for players to wear small earpieces to allow them to hear instructions from coaches.

Woolmer tried the equipment in a couple of benefit matches during the year; it worked well and, just as importantly, went almost unnoticed. After checking it did not breach either the tournament regulations or the laws of cricket, he suggested to Cronje they use it in the tournament itself. He agreed and when the proposal was mentioned to Allan Donald, he too said he was willing to give it a try.

South Africa tried the earpieces out in one of their warm-up matches and again it attracted no comment, so they decided to use them when South Africa played India in the two sides’ opening game in Hove on May 15. Mohammad Azharuddin won the toss and batted and when Cronje led his side on to the field he and Donald had their earpieces in place.

It did not take long for the television commentators to spot them, and Sourav Ganguly, who opened for India with Sachin Tendulkar, also noticed, bringing it to the attention of the umpires, Steve Bucknor and David Shepherd, shortly before the drinks break.

The umpires spoke to Cronje, who was quite open about what was going on. Unable to decide if what he was doing was legal, they asked Talat Ali, the match referee, for a ruling. He too was unsure and contacted the ICC, which said that while the earpieces were technically not breaching any rules, they were unfair. As drinks came out, so did Ali, making clear the earpieces had to go. Although the audience on TV was privy to the discussion, most spectators at Hove were left bemused, so small were the devices that were being used.

South Africa went on to win the match and afterwards Woolmer was unrepentant. “All I was trying to do was give help and advice,” he said. “I’m sorry if I’ve upset anyone. I’ve tried to be innovative; the idea was to take the game forward. Where we erred was, I should have asked the ICC for permission. Perhaps I’m naive, but it didn’t occur to me. I felt it was a really good idea and I would like to discuss it with the ICC.

“I’m not trying to disturb the batsman or the captain, I’m just wanting to offer some advice. They use it in American football and I believe the French used it in their World Cup campaign, so I felt it was a really good idea. Hopefully, it will make life easier for the cricketer.”

He also went out of his way to explain the system was not aimed at giving instructions. “If Donald, for example, is not bowling with rhythm I could tell him to run in harder or more softly. It is a way of addressing technical faults by looking at the game from a different angle.”

Cronje was also dismissive of criticism. “There’s nothing in the rules to stop us from using it and it’s very disappointing it’s been stopped,” he said. “The coach sits at a different angle from me and he can give me different options when we’re batting or bowling. It’s always nice to hear another voice.” He also asked if the ICC was going to ban gloves being taken out to batsmen “in case a message from the coach is sent with them”.

If the media hoped Azharuddin would be incensed, they were disappointed. “It’s going to happen,” he said. “It does in other sports.”

ICC spokesman Clive Hitchcock said: ‘We made our position clear when we said that the World Cup is not the event to experiment with new devices. We would listen to anything the South Africa management had to say on the issue, but in view of the fact that we would have to get all the countries together to discuss the issue, it is unlikely these devices will be used again in the current tournament. There may be nothing in the rules banning them but neither is there anything there saying that they can be used.”

When the press asked Ali Bacher, the chief executive of the United Cricket Board of South Africa, for his opinion, he admitted he was aware of Woolmer’s innovation. “Bob came to me about 15 months ago to ask about it and I told him at the time that it could be controversial,” he said. “But Bob has a hyperactive cricket brain and sometimes he gets ahead of himself.”

The South Africans left Hove still hoping they would be allowed to use the earpieces but the ICC made clear it was not going to budge and that was that.

What happened next

  • The ICC subsequently banned the use of such devices but Woolmer was undeterred. “I believe that technology is the way to go forward and we will be using earpieces in the nets at Warwickshire so that I don’t have to keep interrupting players to make my point. But I am also hopeful that I can persuade the ECB to allow the use of earpieces in second team cricket to show that they can be a real help to captains and players.”
  • Less than a year later Cronje was uncovered as a match-fixer and subsequently banned from the game. He died in an air crash in 2002.
  • Woolmer resigned as South Africa coach at the end of the tournament and returned to Warwickshire. He died in suspicious circumstances during the 2007 World Cup.​​

With the end of the Cricket world cup approaching, we still don’t see any modern communications coming into the game, does it matter that the coaches are able to communicate better with their players? other sports allow the coaches to shout and lead players, why wouldn’t cricket? you can find the original source of the article here